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Showing posts from May, 2017

The National Herald - Books by Helen Z. Papanikolas to Add to Your List

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BOOKS BY HELEN Z. PAPANIKOLAS
TO ADD TO YOUR LIST
Published in The National Herald, May 20-26, 2017 Issue Authored by Eleni Sakellis
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We are excited to announce that The National Herald has given Hellenic Genealogy Geek the right to reprint articles that may be of interest to our group. 
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For those of us who are first generation Greek-Americans, whose parents came across in airplanes for the most part, it is often fascinating to hear about the early Greek immigrants who came to America in search of a better life. Today, we take for granted the vast distances that separate us from the homeland, but in the late 19th century and early 20th century, there was a real chance the immigrant would never return home and never again see the beloved shores of Greece. This was especially true for early Greek immigrants to the western United States. The Greek-American community faced unique challenges, and the cultural expe…

Public Library of Kalamata, Messinia, Greece

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PUBLIC LIBRARY OF KALAMATA, GREECE
http://www.laikivivliothiki.gr/

It is in the city centre, in the building of the Municipal Cultural Centre. It was founded in 1933 as a result of the efforts of people of the Arts from Kalamata who wanted all people of the city to have access to books of literature and, in general, to have access to education. It is considered to be one of the most important and complete libraries of southern Greece, with more than 90.000 books, some of them from Medieval times. Apart from books, there are also thousands of journals and also rare handscripts.

33, Aristomenous St., Kalamata Cultural Center, 5th floor, 24100 KALAMATA , MESSINIA , GREECE
Tel.: +30 27210 22607 , Fax: +30 27210 22907

E-mail: info@laikivivliothiki.gr , URL: http://www.laikivivliothiki.gr



Years 2007-2009 Death Notices published in Greek Orthodox Observer Newspaper

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The Orthodox Observer, the national publication of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese, functions as the primary news and information connection and is a direct physical link between the Archdiocese, the Metropolises, parishes and individual parishioners.

The Orthodox Observer has a section titled "In Memoriam" where they print detailed death notices about clergy, presbytera's, and various other important members of the church.

You can access the archives online at https://www.goarch.org/publications/observer

The following are notices printed in the years 2007-2009

January/February 2007 Fr. Nicholas Michael Sitaras Charles S. Sosangelis Fr. George Nicholas Thanos Fr. Peter N. Kyriakos
May 2007 Fr. Michael C. Harmand Very Rev. James Mihalakis Fr. Demetrios Kavadas
June 2007 Fr. Emmanuel Papageorge Katherine Pappas Margarite Chafos
July/August 2007 Fr. Leonidas Kotzakis Presb. Sophronia Tomaras Fr. John H. Paul Fr. Dean Timothy Andrews
September/October 2007 Thomas D. Demery Fr. Nicholas G. Katsoulis V…

Years 2004-2006 Death Notices published in Greek Orthodox Observer Newspaper

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The Orthodox Observer, the national publication of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese, functions as the primary news and information connection and is a direct physical link between the Archdiocese, the Metropolises, parishes and individual parishioners.

The Orthodox Observer has a section titled "In Memoriam" where they print detailed death notices about clergy, presbytera's, and various other important members of the church.

You can access the archives online at https://www.goarch.org/publications/observer

The following are notices printed in the years 2004-2006

January/February 2004
Fr. James Karalexis
Fr. Anthony Mavromaras
Fr Thomas Tsevas
Fr. Constantine Lawrence
Fr. Carl Vouros
Judge Callie Tsapis

July/August 2004
Presbytera Alva Mahalares

September 2004
Fr. Joseph Antonakakis
Fr. Constantine G. Theodore
Fr. Anthony Kosturos
Angela V. Anton, Mother of Metropolitan Tarasios
Rev. Economos Philemon Sevastiades

October/November 2004
Alexandra Leondis
Rebecca Poulos
James Stremanos

December 2004

Years 2001-2003 Death Notices published in Greek Orthodox Observer Newspaper

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The Orthodox Observer, the national publication of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese, functions as the primary news and information connection and is a direct physical link between the Archdiocese, the Metropolises, parishes and individual parishioners.

The Orthodox Observer has a section titled "In Memoriam" where they print detailed death notices about clergy, presbytera's, and various other important members of the church.

You can access the archives online at https://www.goarch.org/publications/observer

The following are notices printed in the years 2001-2003

February 2001
Fr. John C. Poulos
John Rousakis
Angeline . Caruso

March/April 2001
Rev. George Peter Diamant
Matina S. Sarbanes

May 2001
Fr. Theodore Baglaneas
Presbytera Jean Vasilas
Christine Pavlakis
Effie Geanakoplos
Milton H. Sioles
Evangeline J. Zoukis
P. J. Gazouleas
Michael Faklis
Carolyn Korbos Lischett

July/August 2001
Fr. Basil Gregory
Presbytera Georgia Rassias
Presbytera Bessie Thanos
Mary V. Bicouvaris

February/March 2002
Fr. Ni…

The Passing of a Generation: the Demographics of Greek America

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THE PASSING OF A GENERATION: THE DEMOGRAPHICS OF GREEK AMERICANS
Published in The National Herald, May 6-12, 2017 Issue Authored by Steve Frangos TNH Staff Writer
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We are excited to announce that The National Herald has given Hellenic Genealogy Geek the right to reprint articles that may be of interest to our group. 
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Without word or whisper, the passing of an entire generation is nearly complete. The children of the 1880 to 1920 generation of Greek immigrants to the United States are almost gone from our midst. Not too far behind them are their cousins/extended family from Greece who they had sponsored immediately after World War II. This was the Greek-America, I knew and in which I grew up. Now, this world is on the very brink of disappearing forever. Any real historian would already have generated a series of articles on this moment in our collective experience. But, this simply has not taken place.
All this …

The Little Known History of Greek-American Magicians: 1850 to 1906

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THE LITTLE KNOWN HISTORY OF GREEK-AMERICAN MAGICIANS:
1850 to 1906
Published in The National Herald, May 5, 2017 Issue Authored by Steve Frangos TNH Staff Writer
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We are excited to announce that The National Herald has given Hellenic Genealogy Geek the right to reprint articles that may be of interest to our group. 
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While entertainment forms may seem secondary (if even that) to the formation of American notions of persons and things said to Greek, they are in fact very often the only images the majority of average Americans have of persons, events and things Greek. Especially if we are examining early images. Greek magicians, as a topic, has several levels of meaning(s) for the average American. First, any American that went to school (or proved to be a regular reader) knew of Greeks during the Classical Era. As such persons identified as Greek magicians were already known to even the most isolated of audience…

Steve Vasilakes, the White House’s Peanut Man – White House Historical Association

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STEVE VASILAKES, THE WHITE HOUSE'S PEANUT MAN -  WHITE HOUSE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
Published in The National Herald, May 5, 2017 Issue Authored by Steve Frangos TNH Staff Writer
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We are excited to announce that The National Herald has given Hellenic Genealogy Geek the right to reprint articles that may be of interest to our group. 
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WASHINGTON —  Νicholas Stefanos “Steve” Vasilakes emigrated from Ligerea, Greece, to the United States in 1910 and soon thereafter set up his hot peanuts and fresh popped popcorn cart on what actually was White House property. He listed his business address as “1732 Pennsylvania Avenue” and reporters observed he came to represent the “little man” in America, according to www.whitehousehistory.org. He was described as a “burly, fierce mustached Greek” and during World War I he boldly advertised on a hand-painted sign on his cart that on specified weeks he donated all of his proce…